Deprecated: mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in /home/wwiiguns/wwiiguns.com/store/product_catalog.php on line 41
WWII Guns - Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) - Nambu pistol series
    
        
    
SEARCH:

Nambu pistol series

Nambu Model 14, early production model [Airsoft Gas Blowback] 

Nambu Model 14, early production model [Airsoft Gas Blowback]
SOLD OUT

Made in Japan
Operating principle: Gas operated blowback airsoft

Designed by General Kijiro Nambu this 8mm semiautomatic recoil operated locked breech pistol became the standard sidearm for Japanese military in 1930s and continued to be their primary sidearm throughout the World War II.

This is the early production model of the Nambu Type 14, which can be easily recoqnized by its small trigger guard. The Nambus were stamped with extensive production markings and in this replica all the historic Japanese manufacturing and military markings are present as listed below.

The primary operating method of this fine replica Nambu 14 is gas blowback. The magazines are equipped with internal gas tank to house HFC134a gas and 8mm BBs (available at accessories section). The gas is used as power source to fire 8mm plastic BBs to distances up to 30 meters. The bolt recoils back and forth just like in real Nambu when the gun is fired. Loading, cocking and firing actions are as in real Nambu.

Frame and grip are from ABS plastic. Trigger guard, trigger, bolt and magazine are from metal.

Markings:
* Production markings are visible (Nambu/Nagoya arsenal)
* Showa Emperor symbol (Hirohito)
* Production date "11.3" indicating the eleventh year, third month of Hirohito’s reign (March, 1936)
* Final inspection mark
More information

 

$263.00




Nambu Model 14, late production model [Airsoft Gas Blowback] 

Nambu Model 14, late production model [Airsoft Gas Blowback]
Made in Japan
Operating principle: Gas operated blowback airsoft
Availability: SOLD OUT

Designed by General Kijiro Nambu this 8mm semiautomatic recoil operated locked breech pistol became the standard sidearm for Japanese military in 1930s and continued to be their primary sidearm throughout the World War II.

This is the early production model of the Nambu Type 14, which can be easily recoqnized by its small trigger guard. The Nambus were stamped with extensive production markings and in this replica all the historic Japanese manufacturing and military markings are present as listed below.

The primary operating method of this fine replica Nambu 14 is gas blowback. The magazines are equipped with internal gas tank to house HFC134a gas and 8mm BBs (available at accessories section). The gas is used as power source to fire 8mm plastic BBs to distances up to 30 meters. The bolt recoils back and forth just like in real Nambu when the gun is fired. Loading, cocking and firing actions are as in real Nambu.

Frame and grip are from ABS plastic. Trigger guard, trigger, bolt and magazine are from metal.

Markings:
* Production markings are visible (Nagoya arsenal)
* Showa Emperor symbol (Hirohito)
* Production date "19.3" indicating the eleventh year, third month of Hirohito’s reign (March, 1944)
* Final inspection mark
More information

 

$263.00




Baby Nambu (Admiral Yamamoto edition) [Replica model gun] 

Baby Nambu (Admiral Yamamoto edition) [Replica model gun]
SOLD OUT

Made in Japan
Operating principle: Model gun
Extremely rare.
Image gallery: Yes

This is commemorative model of Admiral Yamamoto's Baby Nambu pistol. Comes with wooden case that is covered with silk fabric, manual, poster and dummy cartridges.

Sleek gold-replica external finish and comes with accurate stampings/markings.

The pistol itself is fully operatable and can cycle dummy cartridges (cocking can be done). More information

 

$885.00




Nambu Type 94 Pistol early "1934 manufacture" [Non-firing replica model gun] 

Nambu Type 94 Pistol early "1934 manufacture" [Non-firing replica model gun]
Made in Japan
Operating principle: Fully functional non-firing model gun
Availability: Sold out

The 94 in the name originally refers to the Imperial Year 2594 in Japanese, or the year 1934. Since 1934 to the end of the war in 1945, the Type 94 Pistol was being produced until about 70,000 were built. Even today, decades after the war, the Type 94 Pistol is recognized worldwide, and can occasionally be found sold at gun shows.

Accurate Design and Same As Real Mechanism

The Type 94 Pistol features the same mechanism as the real counterpart gun. The secret behind the mechanism lies in the parts that were used to manufacturer the model gun. The Type 94 is manufactured by Hartford overseas, using high-quality plastic for the inner parts and die-cast materials for the trigger and hammer. The real Type 94 Pistol was a commercial failure, where the gun became notorious for a design flaw referred to as suicide gun. By pressing an exposed sear on the left-hand side of the receiver, a round in the chamber could be fired. The design in the Hartford model gun is accurately replicated. While the real gun's design flaw led the Type 94 pistol to become known as one of the worst military pistols ever, the accurate replication of the exposed sear in the Type 94 Model Gun should be a notable interest to model gun enthusiasts. Despite the stories regarding the design flaw in the real gun, when you hold the Type 94 Model Gun, you can instantly appreciate the fine Japan-made worksmanship. The model fits snug in your hand, and there is absolutely no waste in extra weight or unnecessary parts whatsoever.

Just like the real gun, the Type 94 Pistol Non-Firing Model Gun has accurately captured all of the key features. The Type 94 Pistol is referred to as having a big head and a small butt for the silhouette of the grip. The magazine was relatively tight, and holds only 6 rounds. The small front sight, coupled with an equally small rear sight, is accurately portrayed in the model gun's design.

Also accurately portrayed is the magazine safety mechanism from the original Type 94 Pistol. If the magazine is removed, the trigger cannot be pulled. The magazine button and bottom are both realistically re-produced, where the 8mm dummy cartridge models are just like real. On the right side of the model, is a serial number and the date August of Showa Year 12, and the Nagoya Manufacturer from war period inscribed. The front sight is made of a separate part, just like the real thing. More information

 

$438.00




Nambu Type 94 Pistol mid-war "1943 manufacture" [Non-firing replica model gun] 

Nambu Type 94 Pistol mid-war "1943 manufacture" [Non-firing replica model gun]
Made in Japan
Operating principle: Fully functional non-firing model gun
Availability: By special order

You are viewing a replica of mid-war production Type 94 pistol, more specifically a non-firing replica model gun of original model manufactured in December 1943.

It has the features of 1943 manufacture Type 94 pistol such as for example more detailed grip pattern, fully inserted frame pins (not protruding as in early production models), wider barrel support in frame, smaller front sight and slightly different color of surface finish.

The 94 in the name originally refers to the Imperial Year 2594 in Japanese, or the year 1934. Since 1934 to the end of the war in 1945, the Type 94 Pistol was being produced until about 70,000 were built. Even today, decades after the war, the Type 94 Pistol is recognized worldwide, and can occasionally be found sold at gun shows.

Accurate Design and Same As Real Mechanism

The Type 94 Pistol features the same mechanism as the real counterpart gun. The secret behind the mechanism lies in the parts that were used to manufacturer the model gun. The Type 94 is manufactured by Hartford overseas, using high-quality plastic for the inner parts and die-cast materials for the trigger and hammer. The real Type 94 Pistol was a commercial failure, where the gun became notorious for a design flaw referred to as suicide gun. By pressing an exposed sear on the left-hand side of the receiver, a round in the chamber could be fired. The design in the Hartford model gun is accurately replicated. While the real gun's design flaw led the Type 94 pistol to become known as one of the worst military pistols ever, the accurate replication of the exposed sear in the Type 94 Model Gun should be a notable interest to model gun enthusiasts. Despite the stories regarding the design flaw in the real gun, when you hold the Type 94 Model Gun, you can instantly appreciate the fine Japan-made worksmanship. The model fits snug in your hand, and there is absolutely no waste in extra weight or unnecessary parts whatsoever.

Just like the real gun, the Type 94 Pistol Non-Firing Model Gun has accurately captured all of the key features. The Type 94 Pistol is referred to as having a big head and a small butt for the silhouette of the grip. The magazine was relatively tight, and holds only 6 rounds. The small front sight, coupled with an equally small rear sight, is accurately portrayed in the model gun's design.

Also accurately portrayed is the magazine safety mechanism from the original Type 94 Pistol. If the magazine is removed, the trigger cannot be pulled. The magazine button and bottom are both realistically re-produced, where the 8mm dummy cartridge models are just like real. On the right side of the model, is a serial number and the date August of Showa Year 12, and the Nagoya Manufacturer from war period inscribed. The front sight is made of a separate part, just like the real thing. More information

 

$475.00




Nambu Type 94 Pistol late-war "1945 manufacture" [Non-firing replica model gun] 

Nambu Type 94 Pistol late-war "1945 manufacture" [Non-firing replica model gun]
Made in Japan
Operating principle: Fully functional non-firing model gun
Availability: By special order

You are viewing a replica of late-war production Type 94 pistol, more specifically a non-firing replica model gun of original model manufactured in March 1945.

It has the features of 1945 "last-ditch" manufacture Type 94 pistol such as for example wooden made grip, squareback slide-end (it was easier to make by unskilled labor), larger front sight, non-surface finished magazine and a slightly different color of surface finish.

The 94 in the name originally refers to the Imperial Year 2594 in Japanese, or the year 1934. Since 1934 to the end of the war in 1945, the Type 94 Pistol was being produced until about 70,000 were built. Even today, decades after the war, the Type 94 Pistol is recognized worldwide, and can occasionally be found sold at gun shows.

Accurate Design and Same As Real Mechanism

The Type 94 Pistol features the same mechanism as the real counterpart gun. The secret behind the mechanism lies in the parts that were used to manufacturer the model gun. The Type 94 is manufactured by Hartford overseas, using high-quality plastic for the inner parts and die-cast materials for the trigger and hammer. The real Type 94 Pistol was a commercial failure, where the gun became notorious for a design flaw referred to as suicide gun. By pressing an exposed sear on the left-hand side of the receiver, a round in the chamber could be fired. The design in the Hartford model gun is accurately replicated. While the real gun's design flaw led the Type 94 pistol to become known as one of the worst military pistols ever, the accurate replication of the exposed sear in the Type 94 Model Gun should be a notable interest to model gun enthusiasts. Despite the stories regarding the design flaw in the real gun, when you hold the Type 94 Model Gun, you can instantly appreciate the fine Japan-made worksmanship. The model fits snug in your hand, and there is absolutely no waste in extra weight or unnecessary parts whatsoever.

Just like the real gun, the Type 94 Pistol Non-Firing Model Gun has accurately captured all of the key features. The Type 94 Pistol is referred to as having a big head and a small butt for the silhouette of the grip. The magazine was relatively tight, and holds only 6 rounds. The small front sight, coupled with an equally small rear sight, is accurately portrayed in the model gun's design.

Also accurately portrayed is the magazine safety mechanism from the original Type 94 Pistol. If the magazine is removed, the trigger cannot be pulled. The magazine button and bottom are both realistically re-produced, where the 8mm dummy cartridge models are just like real. On the right side of the model, is a serial number and the date August of Showa Year 12, and the Nagoya Manufacturer from war period inscribed. The front sight is made of a separate part, just like the real thing. More information

 

$475.00




Type 26 Heavyweight Revolver [Replica cap firing model gun] 

Type 26 Heavyweight Revolver [Replica cap firing model gun]
Made in Japan
Operating principle: Cap firing model gun
Availability: Special order only.

The Type 26 "hammerless" revolver was the first modern pistol adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army. It was developed at the Koishikawa Arsenal and is named for its year of adoption in the Japanese dating system (the 26th year of the reign of the Meiji emperor, i.e., 1893). The revolver saw action in conflicts including the Russo-Japanese War, World War I and World War II.

The Type 26 was originally intended to be used as a sidearm for cavalry, and typically features a lanyard ring on the pistol butt. Due to supply shortages, it was widely used as an auxiliary weapon and remained in service until the end of the Second World War.

You are viewing an highly realistic 1:1 size fully functional model gun replica of the IJA Type 26 revolver. Featuring cap firing replica Japanese 9mm cartridges, working double-action hammer, revolver cylinder, openable trigger guard and side plate and disassembly functions. More information

 

$458.00